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In ‘Eyes As Big As Plates,’ Sculptural Garments Camouflage Subjects in Natural Environments

Claudia Baldwin

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#books
#camouflage
#landscapes
#nature
#portraits

In ‘Eyes as Big as Plates,’ Sculptural Garments Camouflage Subjects in Natural Environments

February 11, 2022

Grace Ebert

Eyes as Big as Plates # Andrea (Outer Hebrides 2019)

Hailing from fifteen countries, the individuals participating in Eyes as Big as Plates have backgrounds as varied as their surroundings: there are zoologists, academics, and librarians; fishermen, wild boar hunters, and Sami reindeer herders; and opera singers, kantele players, and artists. They’re tethered by the ongoing project, which dresses each figure in sculptural wearables made of organic materials that allow them to blend in with the surrounding landscape.

Launched in 2011 by Norwegian-Finnish artist duo Karoline Hjorth and Riitta Ikonen (previously), Eyes as Big as Plates hinges on the idea that it’s essential to explore how humans exist within nature. The portraits center on lone figures partially camouflaged with their backdrops or outfitted with imaginative garments constructed with objects found nearby. Boubou (shown below), for example, is a Senegalese fisherman who wears a mesh shawl of sea creatures, while North Tolsta-based photographer Andrea (above) is almost entirely masked by spindly branches and peat near her home. Every portrait comes after a conversation with the subject and a collaborative effort to find the proper location and attire.

The duo has now compiled dozens of photos in a forthcoming book that marks the 10th anniversary of the project. A follow-up to their sold-out first volume, Eyes as Big as Plates 2 is comprised of 52 new portraits, conversations with those featured, and field notes from their travels. “While transcribing the interviews for each of the collaborators here, we got to experience what many of them often say is the most exciting part: ‘ … just being there, looking at a familiar landscape like you’ve never looked at it before. Letting the surroundings wash over you,'” they write.

Eyes as Big as Plates 2 is currently available for pre-order on the project’s site. Some of the series is on view through June at the landmarked entry at 200 5th Avenue in New York and will be up this May at London’s Barbican and at the Harbourfront Centre in Toronto in September.

Eyes as Big as Plates # Boubou (Tasmania 2019)

Eyes as Big as Plates # Liv (Norway 2017)

Eyes as Big as Plates # Momodou Toucouleur (Senegal 2019)

Eyes as Big as Plates # Mr Oh (South Korea 2017)

Eyes as Big as Plates # Niels (Faroe Islands 2015)

Eyes as Big as Plates # Scotty (Tasmania 2019)

Eyes as Big as Plates # Sinikka (Norway 2019)

#books
#camouflage
#landscapes
#nature
#portraits

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25 One-Hit Wonders You Probably Haven’t Thought About Since Your Childhood, but They Look Good As HECK Today

Claudia Baldwin

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Sean Kingston has only gotten better with age.

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Original Source: buzzfeed.com

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Street Photography by Juri Nesterov Documents Ukrainian Life Across Decades

Claudia Baldwin

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Kyiv. 2020. All images shared with permission.

Photography, and street photography, in particular, has the power to preserve the fleeting, framing the brief encounters and dalliances that sometimes end as quickly as they began. This impulse to document the momentary permeates throughout Juri Nesterov‘s body of work that serves as a visual record of those he’s witnessed within the last five decades. “When I look into the camera’s viewfinder, something inexplicable happens: thousands of images appear in my memory,” he writes.

Nesterov was born in 1954 in Krasnyi Luch, a city in the Luhansk province of what is now Ukraine. At the time, the area was part of Soviet Russia, and this shift in borders parallels the photographer’s practice, which often centers on the transient and ephemeral nature of the human experience.

Krasnyi Luch (Khrustalny). 1987.

Because of revolution, war, and collapse, Nesterov’s photos also chronicle life under the control of governments that have since dissolved, and the context of being surrounded by such inability makes his focus on the fundamental humanity of his subjects even more impactful. He says:

After a while, looking at my prints, I feel like the photos are electric. Most of the time I hear the question: “Where was this picture taken” or “What kind of camera? What lens?” I really want to answer: “in the world of people with their thoughts, disappointments, and hopes.”…Does it matter where exactly I pressed the camera button?… Look at the world, we all have the same starry sky.

Nesterov worked in journalism for many years and has exhibited his photos throughout Europe, although some of his prints housed at a Ukrainian museum were destroyed during shelling a few years back. Head to Flickr to explore an incredible archive of his photos that until recently, he was still developing in his kitchen in Kyiv.

Krasnyi Luch (Khrustalny). 1985.

Christmas ornaments. Kyiv, Ukraine, 2016.

Krasnyi Luch (Khurstalny). 1984.

Holiday village. Near Kyiv, Ukraine. 2018.

Makeevka. 1987.

Friendship. Kyiv, Ukraine. 2018.

Makeevka. 1987.

Kyiv, Ukraine, 2016.

Pereyaslav-Khmelnitski, Ukraine, 2016.

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Kourtney Kardashian Says She Got Therapy After She ‘Couldn’t Stop Crying’ Following Scott Disick Split

Claudia Baldwin

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Kourtney Kardashian revealed therapy has made her ‘really sensitive’ and helped her deal with an ‘abundance of feelings.’

Kourtney Kardashian, 42, revealed she’s been on a “therapy journey” since 2017 — which would have began shortly after her split from longtime boyfriend Scott Disick, 39. “I would just start crying all the time,” she said in Bustle magazine’s March 3 issue of what made her seek mental health support. “‘I just have feelings; like, an abundance of them,” she added, noting that working with a therapist has made her more “sensitive.”

The Poosh founder and former beau Scott began their rocky romance back in 2007, and welcomed three kids together: Mason, 11, Penelope, 9, and Reign, 6. Shortly after the birth of Reign, and amid Scott’s on-going struggles with drugs and alcohol, the pair called things quits. Over the years, Scott has maintained a close relationship with the Kardashian-Jenner clan — particularly with Kourtney’s younger sister Khloe Kardashian and mom Kris Jenner. Kourtney has admitted that Scott continuing to be included by her family members on vacations and holidays made moving on from the relationship more difficult.

Kourtney Kardashian and Scott Disick began their romance in 2007, and split for good in 2016. (SplashNews)

After engaging in therapy, she says she experienced “growth” that helped her move forward. “I see the growth that comes from those unhappy places which make it all worth it. I’m like, ‘If we didn’t go through these roller coasters, you wouldn’t get to the good part,’” she added.

Kourtney Kardashian and fiancé Travis Baker. (Evan Agostini/Invision/AP/Shutterstock)

Kourt is now in a much happier place in her life: the reality star began a romance with fiancé Travis Barker, 46, in early 2021 that lead to a proposal just 10 months later. This marks Kourtney’s first time being engaged, and the pair — affectionately named “Kravis” — seem happier than her. After her split from Scott, the 42-year-old also dated model Younes Bendjima on-and-off.

The health guru has previously opened about therapy, revealing she has a “double session” weekly to Health magazine. “I look forward to it every week! Having that awareness, I find that I can almost catch things before they become a bigger deal,” she said. “When those harder moments do happen, I think, ‘What’s the lesson that I’m supposed to be learning?’” she pondered.

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