Connect with us

Environment

The State of Climate Tech Funding

Claudia Baldwin

Published

on

Date/Time: September 14, 2022 (1-2PM ET / 10-11AM PT)

Innovation and startups have a critical role to play in creating the climate future we want, especially in the face of lagging policies and yet-to-be-realized market demand. While fears of a recession in the U.S. and mass layoffs are driving down startup valuations and freezing hiring, climate startup funding deals are at least on track with last year, with more funding reserves to sustain the current downturn. Pitchbook reported in June that climate tech is the third most disruptive industry over the next five to 10 years. What is the current state of climate tech funding, and what does this mean for the state of startups and investors over the next 12-18 months?

Topics will include:

How investors are deploying capital
Ways startups can design a resilient fundraising strategy
Methods for startups to plan for long-term success in times of volatility

Moderator:

Sherrie Totoki, Director of Startup Programs, GreenBiz Group

Speakers:

Leah Garden, Climate Tech Reporter, GreenBiz Group
Catherine Von Burg, CEO & President, SimpliPhi Power

If you aren’t able to tune in live, you can register to access the archived webcast footage and resources after the webcast.

Read More

Original Post: greenbiz.com

Continue Reading
Click to comment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Environment

Episode 340: What Needs to Happen at COP27

Claudia Baldwin

Published

on

This week’s run time is 46:59.

WEEK IN REVIEW (5:10)
FEATURES
What needs to happen at COP27 (19:50)

Perspective from Aron Cramer, president and CEO of BSR.

Leadership Lessons: Jill Dumain (32:15)

This spring, the WSLA Alumnae Group recognized 11 women at the forefront of the sustainability profession. These leaders have made a difference by advancing new technologies or strategies, by overcoming personal and professional obstacles and by committing to mentoring other women. Meet one of the 2022 honorees: Jill Dumain, global vice president of sustainability solutions at SGS.

*Music in this episode

Coma-Media: “Chill Abstract (Intention),” “Soft Beat.”Lee Rosevere: “I’m Going for a Coffee,” “Introducing the Pre-Roll,” “Let That Sink In.”

STAY CONNECTED

To make sure you don’t miss the newest episode of GreenBiz 350, subscribe on iTunes or Spotify. Have a question or suggestion for a future segment? Email us at [email protected].

Read More

Article: greenbiz.com

Continue Reading

Environment

How to Use Climate Science to Drive Your Net Zero Strategy

Claudia Baldwin

Published

on

Date/Time: December 8, 2022 (1-2PM ET / 10-11AM PT)

New Global Carbon Budget (GCB) projections – recently released at COP27 in Sharm el-Sheikh, Egypt – showcase not only how much progress has been made in the past year to reduce CO2 emissions, but also how many years of “carbon budget” we have left.

Join us to learn about the latest GCB, last year’s carbon emissions trends, and how leaders can use this date to drive net zero strategies.

The webinar will be led by University of Exeter Professor and leading author of the GCB Pierre Friedlingstein, who will discuss:

Current trends and sources in global carbon emissions
The biggest emitters – and what can be done
How leaders can use this data to build and support their net zero plans
What emissions trends mean for the remaining carbon budget
Challenges and recommendations to reach net-zero CO2 emissions, and limit global warming to 1.5 degrees Celsius
How we can demystify climate science and apply it to decision-making

Speakers:

Pierre Friedlingstein, Professor and Chair in Mathematical Modelling of the Climate System at the University of Exeter
Jamie Beck Alexander, Director, Drawdown Labs

Moderator:

Dylan Siegler, VP Sustainability, GreenBiz Group

If you can’t tune in live, please register and we will email you a link to access the webcast recording and resources, available to you on-demand after the live webcast.

Read More

Original Source: greenbiz.com

Continue Reading

Environment

In an Economy Obsessed With Growth, We Must Find a Way to Reduce Consumption

Claudia Baldwin

Published

on

This article originally appeared in our Circularity Weekly newsletter. Subscribe to the newsletter here.

The zero waste hierarchy from Zero Waste International Alliance is currently my favorite representation of the methods we can use to get from our current wasteful, linear economy to one where materials are being rethought upstream and intercepted downstream to keep them in use. In the model, we start at the top of the funnel by rethinking and redesigning our products to increase their potential for circularity. Next, and very important, we reduce our consumption. After those are all of the downstream activities that can keep materials in use longer. If all else fails, the hierarchy is instructive on how to dispose of products and materials in the best way possible. Representing upstream activities in the same hierarchy as downstream activities is one reason I’m drawn to this model.

The second layer of the hierarchy, reduction, is where I want to focus my attention today. I think reduction is both the most difficult and most important intervention that companies can participate in.

Why is reduction difficult?

Simply put, reduction only exists on the margins of corporate vocabulary and it is almost never thought of as a revenue driver. I spent enough time working in corporate America to know that the need for ever-increasing profit is almost exclusively spoken about through the lens of taking market share from competitors and/or growing the overall market. The other levers of increased profitability such as efficiency gains, new business models and waste reduction are often discussed by the sustainability or operations team, but are not often connected directly to increased profitability in a company’s quarterly or annual goals.

We see this reflected quite often in the more detailed conversations amongst corporate practitioners at circular economy events. Much of the discussion is left to how we redesign products and packaging for a future in circularity and far less of the conversation is devoted to how we simply sell less while increasing profits. Even most of the new business model conversation at events is centered on continuing to put more and more product out into the world, but just through different means, like the new rental or shared ownership model, to make sure it comes back for recycling.

Why is reduction important?

I don’t think there is a sector of the economy where reduction can be ignored. We need to reduce the manufacture of new products. We need to reduce how much food we waste. We need to reduce the amount of plastic we produce and we need to reduce how much energy we use for service industries.

As a global population, we know we are using about 1.75 earths worth of biological resources each year and we are running low on critical minerals we need to power our future economy. These two warning signs should be plenty to shift the conversation towards reduction, but it just isn’t happening yet in the ways it needs to and at the highest levels of leadership in both governments and in companies.

I admit that I don’t know how to steer the dialogue toward lower consumption business models. I wish I did. I’ll continue to try. I invite you to try with me.

I’d also love to hear from all of you on source reduction. If your company is doing this well, if you have an idea about how to steer the dialogue or if you just want to chat, please reach out to me via LinkedIn.

Read More

Original Source: greenbiz.com

Continue Reading

Trending

WVPU.com